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I Wish I Went Bigger

It may sound cliché “I wish I had gone bigger,” but the reality is, that’s what majority of women say after their procedure, and the most common reason for breast revision surgery is to go larger. Its especially very common for this feeling around the three month post op mark, and the reason for this is that for the first few weeks, your breasts are swollen and larger than they are going to be. You get used to things that way and when the swelling goes down and the implants settle, women say they liked them better when they were swollen.

One of the biggest issues with cosmetic surgery is not having a clear vision of what you will look like after surgery. While 3D imaging technology is now available and assists in demonstrating what a patient might look like after surgery, not all plastic surgeons have this imaging, and for those that do, it’s still not “exact.”
Many plastic surgeons use the standard technique of having a patient try on different implant sizes/shapes/types into a bra that has no padding or wires. While this provides somewhat of a visual, it’s far from ideal. When you place an implant on top of your own breast, you aren’t truly getting a real picture of what you will look like. When an implant is placed under the muscle of the breast, some significant volume is lost from what you would see when placing an implant on top of your own breast.

How do you avoid becoming one of those “I wish I went bigger” with my breast implants? 

The women who tend to fall into the category of being very unsure of the “right” breast implant to choose are in the middle demographic of patients considering breast augmentation. There are the ultra-conserative patients who want to be very small and then there are the women who want that “wow” factor; the bigger the better. Right now, the trend is in this middle place “I want to be bigger, but not too big, but not too small, but also want them to look natural.” This is the hardest group to please.

It is all about proper selection of the implant size. This means an in-depth discussion with your surgeon about your expectations. It you are unsure, maybe bring a photograph to demonstrate what you want to look like. This is important because you might go to your surgeon and say things like “I want to be natural looking” or “I just want to be fuller, but don’t want people to notice”. This all sounds reasonable until clients whip out a picture of Pamela Anderson as the results they want! Clearly in this case there is a disconnect between what you say and what you really want.

Also important is to understand how the implant will look after it is “inside”. Breast implants tend to look slightly smaller after they are inserted during surgery. I notice that the implants look about 10% smaller. This means that if you like the way a 350 cc implant looks when you try it on, it may appear more like a 325 cc implant after surgery. In this case, you should consider having a 375 cc implant placed. So if you are considering breast augmentation, and are struggling with what size to choose, just remember you may just want to go with the one that is a little larger. The information below may help put the sizing into perspective.

Breast implants are measured in cubic centimeters (cc). 1 tablespoon = 14.7868 cubic centimeters. Let’s say you are deciding between a 400cc implant and a 450cc implant, that would equate to approximately 4 1/2 tablespoons. When you understand it in these terms, it really doesn’t seem like that much does it?

Lastly, try not to focus on the number of CC’s. Try on your implants without knowing the size and aim to pick some that achieve the look you want. 300cc might give some women a c cup and others a DD cup, so when it comes to implants, the number of cc’s does not matter.